Gun Season
2003-2004


Deer: Spike
Weight: 120 lbs.
Date:
November 28, 2003
Time: 7:25am
Location: Minor Hill, TN
Weapon:
Remington Model 700
Scope: Zeiss 2.5x10x50mm
Caliber: 270Win
Bullet: Nosler Partition 130gr.
Range: 160 yards
Treestand: None
Distance Deer Traveled: 80 yards
 

It was COLD!!  The temperature was 35 degrees but the wind was blowing 20-30 mph out of the North.  I was hunting from a ridge top over looking a draw that was protected by the wind.  I was on the ground watching the draw and looked across the ridge to see a deer walking across the pasture to my left.  The deer was at a steady walk and 150+ yards away.  I was sitting on the ground leaned against a tree with my rifle resting on some shooting sticks.  I quickly moved around to the opposite side of the tree and setup.  The deer was getting very close to going behind some thick trees.  I put the crosshairs on the deer and when it came to the last opening I fired.  I didn't have time to dial the scope up to a higher power and shot the deer on 2.5 power - not much for 160 yards.  I hit a little back but got the back of the lungs and diaphragm.  He ran 80 yards before crashing.  I didn't know it was a spike until I got to the deer - I thought it was a doe.  I was glad to shoot one and get moving to try and warm up :)  Saturday morning the temperature was 25 degrees but it felt much warmer with no wind.


Deer: Doe
Weight: 90 lbs.
Date:
December 23, 2003
Time: 5:15 pm
Location: Paint Rock Valley
Weapon:
Remington Model 700
Scope: Zeiss 2.5x10x50mm
Caliber: 270Win
Bullet: Nosler Partition 130gr.
Range: 30 yards
Treestand: Summit
Distance Deer Traveled: 50 yards

It was an interesting afternoon!  I was hunting a private farm in Paint Rock Valley - the land has only been hunted once all season.  I was in the stand at 3:30pm ready for the afternoon.  I elected to hunt in a narrow hedgerow between two cotton fields.  I saw tons of deer sign on the way into the area!  All the trees were covered with brown, dried Kudzu.  I climbed a tree and was completely enclosed with Kudzu vines.  The Kudzu was great cover!  At 4:15, a small doe came down the edge of the field and passed within bow range of my stand.  I was looking for a racked buck or small doe - this doe was to small.  It looked to be 6-months old and 50 pounds.  Just before time to climb down, I heard some movement behind me and stood up.  All at once, deer started running all around the stand in the Kudzu.  There must have been 15 to 20 deer running all around my stand.  I was so dark in the hedgerow, I could barely see the deer.  After a couple of minutes of running around, a group of 5 or 6 ran out into the pasture and stopped.  I put the crosshairs on the first one - it looked to small - I put the crosshairs on the second one - it looked to small - I put the crosshairs on the third one - it looked just right - I shot and the deer ran through the hedgerow and crashed in the cotton field.  I drug the deer through the cotton field and hedgerow,  out into the pasture and loaded her in the truck.  I headed home for Christmas dinner at Jim's house.  It was a cool afternoon!

 

I shot the deer in the pasture through the limbs

Hidden in a Kudzu Hut

Looking out of stand due South across cotton field


Deer: Doe
Weight: 70 lbs.
Date:
January 7, 2003
Time: Late Afternoon
Location: Paint Rock Valley
Weapon:
Remington Model 700
Scope: Zeiss 2.5x10x50mm
Caliber: 270Win
Bullet: Nosler Partition 130gr.
Range: 120 yards
Treestand: Summit
Distance Deer Traveled: 100 yards

What a wild afternoon!  I got in the stand around 3:30 - it was a great afternoon to hunt - very cold and sunny.  The temperature was in the lower 30's and dropped to the high 20's by dark.  I was looking for a small doe to put in the freezer or a buck.  My stand was located in a tree surrounded by kudzu vines - check out the pictures for the deer above - it was the same tree.  Around 4:30, I heard something behind me and eased around to see two deer feeding on the hedge behind my stand.  They were no more than 10 yards away.  The doe was on the smallish side and her fawn was very small.  The doe would be good for the freezer but with the temperature going down to 17-degree that night and with only the two deer together ... I just couldn't shoot the doe.  It just didn't seem like the right thing to do.  They feed around me for 30-45 minutes staying in bow range the whole time eating browse and grass.  At 5:15, a big doe came out of the creek bed across the cotton field and she was red-hot!  Shaking her tail and looking back - I just knew a buck was following her!  This land has seen very little hunting pressure for the past two decades ... this could be big daddy buck following her.  I watched her in the scope for 15+ minutes and she continued to prance around in the same area - continuously looking back.  I couldn't hold the gun steady any longer and put it down in exchange for my binoculars.  I watched her through the binoculars for a few minutes and then she started acting like she saw another deer - I put the rifle up and saw nothing - it's getting really late and I knew the hunt was almost over due to darkness - I put the rifle down and picked up the binoculars - just then it all broke loose - 4 or 5 more deer came out of the cane below her and I caught the glimpse of a big deer coming out of the cane 20 or so yards behind her.  I grabbed the rifle and found the group of deer running across the field almost to the woods - I scanned back to the next deer and shot.  The cotton has been picked but not bush-hogged - it's still waist high and this deer was jumping through it.  It was a very difficult shot - 120 yards at a running/jumping deer in very low light.  I got a good mark with a tall cedar tree and climbed down.  I immediately found blood and it looked good - now I'm excited.  I'm not sure how big the deer is ... it appeared to have a very big body coming out of the cane - like twice as big as the doe.  I tracked the deer for around 100 yards and lost blood within 20 yards of a black top road.  There's a creek about 10 yards to my right and walk to the creek to check as deer tend to go to water when injured.  The first thing my flashlight hit is the deer.  I'm shocked!  I can't believe it's a small deer!!  I think maybe a car hit the deer and it died there - I jump in the creek and push on the deer .. it's still limber - with all the cold weather over the last few days it has to be the deer I shot.  All I can figure, the deer I shot was between the main group of deer and the big one I saw come out of the cane.  The one I saw come out of the cane had a big body - I was watching the doe and the deer came out at the far right edge of my field of view in the binoculars.  The Zeiss binoculars are very good from edge to edge but with the deer starting to run and the woods so close by - I didn't have time to scan back to him in the binoculars.  If I had, he would've been in the woods before I could've got the rifle up and on him.  The binoculars have two 30mm tubes for viewing and the Zeiss scope has one 50mm tube - it's a good scope but not as good as two eyes in the binoculars.  I was concerned I could pick him up in the scope before he got to the woods - the first deer I saw behind the main group ... I shot.  When I shot, the main group was already in the woods and this deer was 10 yards from the woods ... not much time to make a decision.  I wasn't looking for horns ... just the 10-ring.  It was a bad mistake - it's not the first one I've made and want be the last.  It was the last day of "hunters choice", so all was legal.  I sure would like to get a look at the other deer.


Deer: Spike
Weight: 120 lbs.
Date:
January 15, 2003
Time: 9:30am
Location: Morgan County
Weapon:
Remington Model 700
Scope: Zeiss 2.5x10x50mm
Caliber: 270Win
Bullet: Nosler Partition 130gr.
Range: 50 yards
Treestand: None
Distance Deer Traveled: 0 yards

I hunted until 9:00am and started rambling.  Just after daylight, I saw nine doe and little ones but the activity had quickly ceased.  I climbed down and started rambling looking for buck sign.  I saw this same buck the afternoon before and didn't shoot him.  I've harvested at least one buck in Morgan County for the last 15 years - I was looking to keep the streak alive.  I've passed on some small bucks this year but decided it would be a good time to shoot one.  He'll be some good eating.


Deer: 4 pt.
Weight: 130 lbs.
Date:
January 25, 2003
Time: 5:30pm
Location: Morgan County
Weapon:
Remington Model 700
Scope: Zeiss 2.5x10x50mm
Caliber: 270Win
Bullet: Nosler Partition 130gr.
Range: 75 yards
Treestand: None
Distance Deer Traveled: 0 yards

I saw this deer chasing a doe on Saturday morning and again on Sunday afternoon.  I figured enough was enough - not really the kind of genetics I want to spread around.  One side of his rack is broke off however at 2.5 years old, he should have more rack on the existing side.


Deer: 6 pt.
Weight: 150 lbs.
Date:
January 27, 2003
Time: 8:00am
Location: Morgan County
Weapon:
Remington Model 700
Scope: Zeiss 2.5x10x50mm
Caliber: 270Win
Bullet: Nosler Partition 130gr.
Range: 40 yards
Treestand: None
Distance Deer Traveled: 0 yards

It was cold and windy with a 20+ mph West-Northwest wind.  I hunted this one area several times on an East wind and one saw one small buck.   There's lots of buck sign in the area and seeing no deer made it frustrating.  I decided to try a West wind and come in from the opposite side. It was a long walk of over a mile back into the area - down a mountain, across two creeks and back up the other side.  All the way, the wind was in my face and at 20+ mph - it created a lot of movement for cover.  I followed a good deer trail up the side of the mountain and started down an old logging road covered with pine nettles.  I looked down to the trail 40-yards below me and saw the buck walking the trail with no indication I was in the world.  It's not often to be walking and see a deer at 40 yards before he sees you.  I raise my rifle and followed him to a hole.  He was walking through a maze of puckerbrush and saplings.  I was afraid if I shot him and he ran or fell, he would slide down the mountain to the creek a 100 yards below.  I knew he wouldn't wash away but getting him out of there would take a helicopter.  I wanted to make sure and break a shoulder (or two) with the shot.  He was at to much of an angle to break both shoulders and with him quartering toward me - I broke the entry shoulder and he reared up like a grizzly bear and fell over backward.  He hung on two small trees and didn't slide down the mountain to the creek.  It was my lucky day!  It took me several hours to drag him 40 yards to the old logging road, walk back to the truck, drive around to the East side and ride out on the 4-wheeler to load him up.  He's not a monster but a good buck - I worked hard hunting that area and very proud to harvest him.


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